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Contest: Miss Plastic Surgery


Ever think about taking part in a beauty contest? Had lots of plastic or cosmetic surgery?

If so, there is a must-attend event in November, 2004, in China.

It’s known as The Miss Plastic Surgery contest because no natural babes need show up unless they just want to watch from the cheap seats. Open to women from all nations, The Miss Plastic Surgery Beauty Pageant is only for women who have gone under the knife to improve their looks.

It started when 18-year-old Yang Yuan, an aspiring model, was cut from the Miss Beijing Beauty contest, part of the 2004 Miss Intercontinental Competition. Yang sailed through the first two rounds but, because she had spent $13,250 for eleven separate cosmetic surgeries, the judges got wind of her enhancements and showed her the door, declaring Yang to be “a man-made beauty.” Yang later sued because other cosmetic surgery patients were allowed to stay. But the court booted the case out of court.

Actually, all beauty contests in China got the boot back in 1949. When the Communists first took over, they declared beauty pageants a bourgeois, decadent capitalist practice and outlawed all types in the People’s Republic. But 54 years later, in 2003, the Chinese government had a change of heart and began promoting the idea of attracting some filthy capitalistic bread through tourism; they hosted the Miss World competition for the first time in 2003.

A Chinese businessman read the news and saw an opportunity knocking so he organized the first Miss Plastic Surgery Beauty contest.

Other Chinese pageants have included a Miss Ugly contest where only the severely beauty challenged were allowed to compete. According to the newspaper, China Daily, hundreds entered. The prize? $16,500 worth of facial rejuvenation from a favorite cosmetic surgeon. It went to a 26-year-old who judges decided had the face that could be most improved through surgery.

Mao is probably spinning in his grave, but cosmetic surgery clinics have sprung up in China’s larger cities. Women there spent about $2.4 billion on plastic and cosmetic surgeries in ’03. (Americans, by contrast, dropped $9.4 billion in 2003 on all cosmetic procedures.) The craze, according the China Daily, is mostly because attractive women get better jobs and marry wealthier men. Consequently, China has a million clinics employing some 11 mil1ion people supplying body and facial enhancements and breast augmentations.

But there’s a catch. Don’t plan on sneaking onto the stage at The Miss Plastic Surgery contest if you are a natural babe who can’t pronounce “rhinoplasty” or “microdermabrasion.”

Entrants to the Miss Plastic Surgery contest must show the judges before and after pictures of their cosmetic procedures as well as documents from the surgeons to prove the hopeful’s beauty is entirely man-made.

To view Before and After photos of various cosmetic surgery procedures, Click Here.



If you have any more questions about this topic or would like more information Click Here.

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